Mothering Day




Did you know Mother's Day was initially celebrated on March 21, in synch with the first day of spring? And it still is in Egypt. In Ancient Egyptians, an annual festival was held to celebrate Aset, a goddess who represented the ideal mother and wife. Ancient Egyptians had a yearly festival to honor Aset, one of the most favored and lasting goddesses of ancient Egypt who represented the perfect mother and wife and was the patroness of nature. Aset also was regarded as the mother of all pharaohs and became symbolic of motherhood, and an annual festival was held in her honor. In yoga, Aset is also known as the remover of obstacles. Later, Mother's Day began originating from Greek and Roman spring festivals dedicated to maternal goddesses, and Mothering Sunday has been observed in the European Christian tradition since the 1600s. But the first celebrations of motherhood occurred in Egypt as part of a Pharaonic tradition.


In celebration, we must know what we are celebrating and why. So many Western celebrations are based on consumerism rather than consciousness. Are we celebrating Mothering Dayor going through the motion? If we have the wrong day, does that make a difference, and why was it changed. Aset is the goddess of love who gave birth to Horus. Her son Horus avenged his father's death and killed Set, becoming the first ruler of Egypt. Thus, Isis was regarded as the mother of all pharaohs and became symbolic of motherhood, and an annual festival was held in her honor in the spring with the concept of maternity and new life.


Most of us don't think about it. But Mothering Day is thousands of years old celebration that did not begin in the U.S. on May 12, 1907, by Anna Jarvis, who later resented the day's commercialization. If we go back to the beginning celebration, if we embrace the message of love, goddesses, maternalism, new life, and mothering, maybe we'd see less violence and more peace. Appreciate the nature of mothering.